Posts in Negotiation
Each Negotiation Can Teach Us About Every Negotiation

My friend Alice had an interesting negotiation recently. She had transferred to another division in a large company and found herself tasked with negotiating the vacation of a large storage space filled with office equipment. The task had been neglected for some time and involved a large sum...

Read More

Your Profile as a Negotiator - Part 1 of 5

Here at Negotiating Wisdom, we do three things: Training, Coaching and Speaking

To supplement our training, many participants receive a copy of our E-book,
Negotiating High-Profit Sales. 

This is the first of a 5 part series that are excerpted from that book.  In part 1 (today), we’ll explore your profile as...

Read More

Negotiating in Teams

I've got quite a few upcoming assignments involving negotiating in teams, so I thought ideas in that arena might be a good way to begin the year.

  • Teams are fun! I’m always struck by how often I find teams laughing and enjoying themselves as they prepare for a negotiation. The interaction with others is usually a lot more fun than hammering out a strategy and tactics by yourself.

     
  • A team gives you access to different points of view. No matter how clever or smart you are, no one knows it all. Some situations require diverse sets of knowledge, abilities, or expertise. The different shadings and points of view that emerge from a team approach can pay off in real dollars.
     
    And, as in anything else, there can be downsides:
     
  • Teams take more time. The process of interacting (and exploring all those different options and ideas) takes time. It’s easy to get sidetracked and spend time on dead-end approaches.
     
  • Team solutions can be too complicated. We’ve all experienced a hopelessly complicated end product that was a result of a team effort—take the U.S. Tax Code, for example, or just about any bill that gets through Congress. Negotiations can suffer the same problems.

    When I'm preparing a team for a negotiation, here's a few general guidelines I try to follow:
Read More